GM Is Planning A Massive Chinese Expansion

China Cadillac

GM’s Buick brand is already one of the top selling automakers in all of China, but now the company is setting much higher targets for its entire lineup.

According to The Detroit Free Press, GM is planning on opening 600 additional dealers in China this year alone, bringing the total to near 3,500.

You read that right.

In addition, GM plans to double the amount of cars it is building in China, and also plans to build some of the new Cadillac XTS in China as part of expanding that brand’s reach. By 2016, GM plans sell around five million cars a year in China. It also wants to introduce one new Cadillac to the nation each year for the foreseeable future.

That is nearly double the cars GM is selling in the country today.

The Detroit Free Press also reports that in addition to selling more cars, GM is planning on expanding its electric and green offerings in China. The Volt just recently went on sale in the country and there are plans to expand with other electric cars as well.

GM has sold more cars in China than the US over the last few years, so this expansion in the nation is definitely warranted.

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Famed Plane Maker Hawker Beechcraft Is About To File For Bankruptcy



Hawker Beechcraft 900

It looks like Hawker Beechcraft could be in quite a bit of financial trouble.

According to a report on Reuters, Hawker Beechcraft is getting ready to file for bankruptcy.

The company, which was purchased for $3.3 billion in 2007 by Goldman Sachs Group’s private equity arm and Onex Corporation is beginning the process of a prearranged bankruptcy with its biggest lenders.

It is expected that the lenders, who include Centerbridge Partners, Angelo Gordon and Capital Research & Management, are expected to provide up to $500 million to allow Hawker to continue operations while in bankruptcy.

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These Were The 10 Hottest Selling Cars In February



Ford F150

February proved to be a huge month in sales for the automakers across the board. The mild weather proved a boon as Ford, Chrysler, and GM all turned in impressive numbers.

They are also on the way to a very strong year.

But what cars were consumers having trouble finding in dealerships? Thanks to Cars.com, we have the list of the top 10 cars sold last month.

The split between automakers is even at five Japanese brands and five domestics with a 60/40 split between cars and trucks.

The F-150 is still the best selling truck in America, but was it the number one vehicle sold last month?

10. Ford Fusion: 21,773 sold

Change vs. February 2011: -5.8%

YTD Sales: 35,387

YTD Change: -5.5%

Base Price: $20,705

Source: Ford, Cars.com




9. Toyota Corolla: 22,148 sold

Change vs. February 2011: -14.4%

YTD Sales: 40,136

YTD Change: -13.6%

Base Price: $16,130

Source: Toyota, Cars.com




8. Ram Trucks: 22,595 sold

Change vs. February 2011: 21.2%

YTD Sales: 40,504

YTD Change: 31.3%

Base Price: $21,820

Source: Ram, Cars.com



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DETROIT ON TOP: General Motors Is Once Again The Largest Automaker In The World



general motors headquarters

With over nine million cars sold, General Motors has once again become the world’s largest automaker.

According to the Detroit Free Press, figures released this morning put GM back at the top of the standings, surpassing Toyota and VW to sit at number one.

VW sold a little over eight million cars in 2011 with Toyota estimated to have come in just shy of that mark. The Japanese tsunami played a large role in Toyota’s reduced output and sales.

Almost 600,000 cars were sold in China, a 9.5% gain over 2010. This is outpacing the growth of the overall Chinese market, which stood at 2.5% year-to-year.

This bodes well for GM, as the Chinese market is expected to accelerate once again in 2012.

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Chinese Auto Market Growth Screeches To A Halt



china car

While China had its best ever year of auto sales in 2011, there may be some storm clouds on the horizon.

According to The Detroit News, Chinese auto sales only grew 2.5% in 2011, which is the smallest rate since 1999.

In 2010, sales rose a full 32% over 2009, so this makes 2011 a much less successful year than it initially appeared on paper when China became the number one car market in the world.

The decline can be directly related to the end of tax incentives that were implemented to encourage growth during the global financial crisis. Additionally, Beijing added restrictions to car purchases that worked to slow sales there as well.

While analysts are predicting increased sales in 2012, they do not believe that it will be back to the outrageous levels that were seen during the early and mid 2000s.

Heavy investments from European and Japanese brands have also spelled trouble for Chinese domestics. The established brands are showing the way in quality while also competing directly on price, which is an area where they previously didn’t stand a chance.

High market demand will continue for years, but the trouble could lie in infrastructure. If the Chinese roads and power sources cannot keep up with demand for cars, the industry could enter a precarious position.

Small growth was enough to make China the number one global auto market in 2011, but if marketshare continues to decline, it may not stay at the top for long.

Take a look at these Chinese crash tests >

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Chinese Auto Market Growth Screeches To A Halt



china car

While China had its best ever year of auto sales in 2011, there may be some storm clouds on the horizon.

According to The Detroit News, Chinese auto sales only grew 2.5% in 2011, which is the smallest rate since 1999.

In 2010, sales rose a full 32% over 2009, so this makes 2011 a much less successful year than it initially appeared on paper when China became the number one car market in the world.

The decline can be directly related to the end of tax incentives that were implemented to encourage growth during the global financial crisis. Additionally, Beijing added restrictions to car purchases that worked to slow sales there as well.

While analysts are predicting increased sales in 2012, they do not believe that it will be back to the outrageous levels that were seen during the early and mid 2000s.

Heavy investments from European and Japanese brands have also spelled trouble for Chinese domestics. The established brands are showing the way in quality while also competing directly on price, which is an area where they previously didn’t stand a chance.

High market demand will continue for years, but the trouble could lie in infrastructure. If the Chinese roads and power sources cannot keep up with demand for cars, the industry could enter a precarious position.

Small growth was enough to make China the number one global auto market in 2011, but if marketshare continues to decline, it may not stay at the top for long.

Take a look at these Chinese crash tests >

Please follow Getting There on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:






Chinese Auto Market Growth Screeches To A Halt



china car

While China had its best ever year of auto sales in 2011, there may be some storm clouds on the horizon.

According to The Detroit News, Chinese auto sales only grew 2.5% in 2011, which is the smallest rate since 1999.

In 2010, sales rose a full 32% over 2009, so this makes 2011 a much less successful year than it initially appeared on paper when China became the number one car market in the world.

The decline can be directly related to the end of tax incentives that were implemented to encourage growth during the global financial crisis. Additionally, Beijing added restrictions to car purchases that worked to slow sales there as well.

While analysts are predicting increased sales in 2012, they do not believe that it will be back to the outrageous levels that were seen during the early and mid 2000s.

Heavy investments from European and Japanese brands have also spelled trouble for Chinese domestics. The established brands are showing the way in quality while also competing directly on price, which is an area where they previously didn’t stand a chance.

High market demand will continue for years, but the trouble could lie in infrastructure. If the Chinese roads and power sources cannot keep up with demand for cars, the industry could enter a precarious position.

Small growth was enough to make China the number one global auto market in 2011, but if marketshare continues to decline, it may not stay at the top for long.

Take a look at these Chinese crash tests >

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First Year Sales Of Volt Fall Short Of Chevy’s Goal, But Still Beat Toyota’s Prius



Chevy Volt

While the Volt fell short of selling Chevy’s goal of 10,000 cars in 2011, it still outsold one of its main competitors, just not in the way you might think.

According to Fox News, Chevy only sold 7,671 Volts in 2011 while Toyota sold over 130,000 Prii (and yes, that is Toyota’s official plural form of Prius).

But if we look back to the Prius’ first US sales, 2000, it sold under 6,000 of the cars in six months on the market. In the 11 years since, the Prius has been adopted with open arms amongst the green community.

The Volt also has an MSRP that was double that of the original Prius, so taking that into account makes the sales that much more impressive.

As one of the first mainstream hybrids, the Prius needed time to become established amongst traditional cars in the marketplace.

Similarly, the Volt is one of the first mass market plug-in hybrid electrics which has made it receive an equally skeptical reaction from the public. With controversial aspects like a high price and recent battery fires, the Volt has had to overcome quite a few obstacles to establish a place in the market.

If the Prius is any indicator, a revolutionary car like the Volt will overcome the initial trepidation and lackluster sales to become a market leader.

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Lookout China, India’s Luxury Car Market Is On The Move



india

While Indian manufacturer Tata has made a lot of news with their introduction of the Nano, the world’s cheapest car, a more unlikely sector of the Indian market is also seeing large growth.

Luxury cars.

According to Henry Foy of Reuters, the $1 Billion luxury car market in India is expanding at a rate of 40% each year.

But even growth like that still puts India’s market far behind China. Mercedes and BMW are on track to sell 20,000 cars in India over this fiscal year. In China, they sold 320,000.

India’s nascent luxury growth is being spurred by the younger generation of new millionaires. Whether they are self-made or inherited wealth, a big German sedan or Italian exotic is the new status symbol.

Salesmen are finding that Indian carbuyers are also skipping certain segments of the market, going from a subcompact Honda straight to a large Mercedes sedan with no step in between.

Even though growth for the market is outstanding, there are still a few factors that are limiting.

For high performance offerings, the roads are the biggest issue. The areas of India’s roadway network that are paved are marked with potholes and bumps. There are hardly any areas to go quickly, or even drive, a high performance car.

Frequently the lower, faster cars need to be transported by flatbed to India’s super dangerous highways for private supercar parades.

The government also levies heavy taxes on imported luxury goods that can go up to 110%, making cars far more expensive than they are in mainland Europe. Taxes are reduced for domestic goods and many manufacturers are opening Indian factories to take advantage.

While manufacturers shift much of their focus to China, it will definitely behoove them to keep a close eye on India.

Now take a look at the car of the week >

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